Academic journal article Information Technology and Libraries

Guest Editorial: The Changing Role of Libraries in Instructional Support

Academic journal article Information Technology and Libraries

Guest Editorial: The Changing Role of Libraries in Instructional Support

Article excerpt

The application of technology to instruction and to information access has proliferated greatly in recent years. Faculty have become increasingly aware of the need for expertise in developing instructional technology, and students expectations continue to rise. In this climate, libraries are seeing new opportunities for providing technology services for users.

Libraries have historically been early adopters of technology. They have developed online catalogs and provided patrons with vast information resources, first through telnet and similar applications and then through the Web. Often these developments have occurred through partnerships with campus organizations such as the information technology department and with the input of teaching faculty.

As technology has become commonplace in classroom and library instruction, libraries are developing new services and resources. The library is ideally positioned to develop and deliver new services because of its centrality to the overall instructional mission of the institution. These new services often arise out of existing relationships between librarians and teaching faculty that evolved from the need for bibliographic instruction.

Some instructional services operations have existed in libraries for many years, but many are just now being developed. This issue highlights examples of both. Howard Carter and Kevin Rundblad describe an operation that has provided a broad range of instructional services for faculty for over fifty years. As the needs of the faculty have changed, the services offered have also changed. They discuss new opportunities realized through partnerships with other campus organizations. Jacqueline Mundell, Coryl Celene-Martel, and Tom Braziunas discuss reorganization at a community college that has created a collaborative environment among the library, media services, distance learning, and the teaching and learning center. The result of the change is easy access for users and increased interaction between departments. Similarly, M. Claire Stewart and H. Frank Cervone show how more opportunities for better service to users resulted from the library's use of technology in electronic reserve, digitization services, and streaming media, and by co-locating academic technologies, the library's digital media services, and collection management. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.