Academic journal article The Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality

Anderson, J. (2003). Condom Use and HIV Risk among U.S. Adults. American Journal of Public Health, 93, 912-914

Academic journal article The Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality

Anderson, J. (2003). Condom Use and HIV Risk among U.S. Adults. American Journal of Public Health, 93, 912-914

Article excerpt

Data from surveys in the United States have indicated that since the 1980s, condom use among adolescents and adults has increased. However, there has been no nationally representative data on condom use among U.S. adults since the mid-1990s. The purpose of the Anderson study was to analyze data from the General Social Survey from 1996, 1998, and 2000 to determine trends in condom use among U.S. adults. The General Social Survey, using a national household-based probability sample of U.S. adults aged 18 and over, contained several questions on sexual behaviour and condom use. The 2000 version of the survey also included items on injection drug and crack cocaine use.

Condom use at last sexual intercourse varied little between 1996 (20.5%), 1998 (18.3%), and 2000 (19.7%). Condom use with partners other than a primary, ongoing partner was higher but was also little changed between 1996 (47.7%), 1998 (37.0%), and 2000 (44.5%). Data from the 2000 sample indicated that condom use was more likely for people who were younger, unmarried, Black, had two or more sexual partners in the last year, and who were at higher risk for HIV infection. …

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