Academic journal article Air Power History

From the Editor

Academic journal article Air Power History

From the Editor

Article excerpt

Did you ever wonder why the best close air support plane of World War II--the F-47 Thunderbolt--did not fly in the Korean War? Michael Rowland asked himself the same question and then decided to search for an answer. His penetrating article leads off this issue of Air Power History.

Another frequently asked history question concerns air victory credits. For example, "Were any men in the enlisted ranks 'aces?'" (That is, that they destroyed at least five enemy planes.) Most historians would say, "No." In his article about "Big Ben Warmer," John W. Hinds presents documentary and photographic evidence to support Warmer's claim to fame.

Kenneth Werrell characterizes the "propeller era," that ran through the 1960s, as "The Dark Ages of Strategic Airlift." The turning point, he says, came at the start of the Kennedy administration with the introduction of jet-powered airlifters and their assignment to higher operational priority.

In April 2003, aviation writer-photographer David Styles attended the sixty-first Doolitle Raiders' reunion at Travis Air Force Base, California. He writes of the raid's impact on both American and British forces in stopping the Japanese onslaught. It is for these reasons that Styles appeals to air enthusiasts to support the Doolittle Air and Space Museum at Travis AFB.

While the Doolittle Raiders attacked Japan near the beginning of the Pacific War, Richard Lineberger flew against Japan at the end of the war. …

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