Academic journal article Library Resources & Technical Services

Recent Work in Cataloging and Classification, 2000-2002

Academic journal article Library Resources & Technical Services

Recent Work in Cataloging and Classification, 2000-2002

Article excerpt

This article provides a review of cataloging and classification publications that appeared in the last two years. The review considers the papers in two categories. Cataloging Theories and Practices covers descriptive cataloging, authority control, classification, subject cataloging, cataloging nonbook materials, electronic resources and metadata, and international cooperation. The second section covers other issues related to cataloging, including management, and education and training. Throughout the review, the author identifies trends and important developments in the area of cataloging and classification.

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Cataloging literature published from late 2000 through early 2002 reflects ongoing, if not increasing, interest in the cataloging of electronic resources. Numerous meetings and newly formed interest groups on this topic have been convened while cataloging rules and standards have undergone significant revisions (McKiernan 2002a; 2002b). Another recognizable characteristic of this body of literature is its international scope. In a number of papers, issues on bibliographic control and international cooperation have been discussed to facilitate the exchange and retrieval of bibliographic information at the international level.

This article will briefly describe cataloging and classification publishing highlights of the last two years through a review of the literature. This review is limited to print materials and a few Web resources. The reviewed papers are organized and presented in two parts. Part one focuses on cataloging theories and practices, and consists of the following categories: (1) descriptive cataloging, (2) authority control, (3) classification, (4) subject cataloging, (5) cataloging nonbook materials, (6) electronic resources and metadata, and (7) international cooperation. Part two covers other cataloging-related issues, such as management and education and training.

Cataloging Theory and Practice

Descriptive Cataloging

For the last two years, a significant part of the rules and standards used for descriptive cataloging have been revised, mainly due to ever-changing technology generating changes at a rapid pace. In this section, recent revisions made in International Standard Bibliographic Description (ISBD), Anglo-American Cataloging Rules (AACR), and MAchine Readable Cataloging (MARC) are summarized. Impacts of Fundamental Requirements for Bibliographic Records (FRBR), which the International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) introduced as early as 1997, are also discussed, followed by some problems in descriptive cataloging.

Rules and Standards

AACR has been continually modified to incorporate revisions necessitated by a changing technological environment since the 1967 publication of the first edition. Manning (2000) provides a brief history of AACR and summarizes recent developments in the cataloging rules, including those resulting from the advent of the Internet. Redefining "seriality" and restructuring bibliographic data based on an entity-relationship model are examples of the recent developments.

In late 2002, the 2002 revision of AACR2 (AACR2r 2002), incorporating all the amendments in 1999 and 2001 and also including additional revisions finalized in 2002, was published in loose-leaf format for updating. Three chapters of the AACR2r (2002) have undergone significant changes: chapters 3, 9, and 12. Chapter 3 for Cartographic Materials has changed to include rules for cartographic materials in electronic form and other updated rides. Chapter 9, whose title was changed from "Computer Files" to "Electronic Resources," now contains rules aligned with the International Standard Bibliographic Description for Electronic Resources (ISBD(ER)). The provision of a distinction between direct access and remote access to electronic resources is an example of such alignment. Chapter 12, formerly "Serials" but now titled "Continuing Resources," has been revised to accommodate "seriality" in the rules. …

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