Academic journal article Quebec Studies

Editor's Note

Academic journal article Quebec Studies

Editor's Note

Article excerpt

Few ideas have been more influential in contemporary literary theory over the last decade than that of "postcolonialism." And yet, while francophone studies across the United States have been energized by postcolonial theory in its various f0rms, there has always been some hesitation about its application to Quebec. Certainly the term has not gained wide currency within Quebec itself, or in France for that matter. But while in the latter case this indifference can be dismissed as a typical "metropolitan" gesture--or, by an ironic twist, as another instance of French suspicion of anglophone imperialism in critical discourse (no matter that the leading postcolonial critics have hailed from former colonies themselves)--the lack of response in Quebec is less easy to explain. Is it because the postcolonial state is linked to the achievement of independence? But in that case, how is it the term has been applied to French departements such as Guadeloupe and Martinique? Perhaps the explanation lies in the opposite direction: is assuming a postcolonial identity a sign of a continuing dependence on former colonial centers that Quebec writers and critics no longer feel, whether or not they remain committed to separation from Canada? Whatever the case, an awkwardness remains, an intellectual unease that calls out for fresh analysis.

I am grateful to Vincent Desroches for helping Quebec Studies answer that call. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.