Academic journal article Research-Technology Management

Salaries of Scientists, Engineers and Technicians: A Summary of Salary Surveys, 20th Edition

Academic journal article Research-Technology Management

Salaries of Scientists, Engineers and Technicians: A Summary of Salary Surveys, 20th Edition

Article excerpt

Eleanor L. Babco and Nathan E. Bell; Commission on Professionals in Science and Technology, Washington, DC, 2003: 429 pp., $100 ($75 for CPST members) from CPST, 1200 New York Ave. NW, Suite 390. Washington, DC 20005; http://www.cpst.org

A brief narrative analysis of economic conditions in the sciences and engineering is accompanied by more than 400 tables of salary data from more than 100 salary surveys from private and public organizations, to provide information on starting and advanced salaries by field, experience level, degree level, and type of employer, with differentials by sex, type of job and geographic area. The report finds that a weak job market for new college graduates has also affected salaries for experienced workers. Most scientists and engineers received salary increases that allowed them to barely keep up with inflation. Not surprisingly, increases were not uniform across all fields or across all employment sectors. Among other principal findings:

* Generally, doctoral scientists and engineers working in private for-profit organizations reported the highest median salary while those working in state and local governments reported the lowest. …

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