Academic journal article T H E Journal (Technological Horizons In Education)

Literacy Development

Academic journal article T H E Journal (Technological Horizons In Education)

Literacy Development

Article excerpt

Multimedia courseware has been demostrated to be highly effective in developing basic literacy skills. IBM's pioneering Writing to Read program, for example, has helped over two million young children learn to read since 1984.

Writing to Read was developed by the highly regarded educator John Henry Martin. Martin recently has developed a new program for IBM called Writing to Write for the next stage in a child's development.

"Writing to Write teaches kids how to organize their thoughts so they can write," says IBM's Greaves. "The program will present a picture and ask that things be described in progressive detail. It will literally talk to you. It causes kids to examine things and develop their story. With this program, we've got kids writing several-page stories in early grades. That's unheard of."

Tragically, many adults have never developed even basic literacy skills. Approximately one in five adult Americans--an estimated 27 million individuals--are functionally illiterate. Today, IBM interactive multimedia is doing a lot to help through a revolutionary adult literacy program called PALS (Principles of Adult Literacy System), developed by John Henry Martin. Designed for adults and adolescents who read below the sixth-grade level, PALS is based on a system of phonemic spelling, and is now available on the PS/2.

A crucial element of PALS is its friendly, intuitive multimedia interface. Obviously, one can't expect functional illiterates to come prepared with computer literacy. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.