Academic journal article Research-Technology Management

Women, Minorities, and Persons with Disabilities in Science and Engineering: 2002, NSF 03-312

Academic journal article Research-Technology Management

Women, Minorities, and Persons with Disabilities in Science and Engineering: 2002, NSF 03-312

Article excerpt

National Science Foundation, Division of Science Resources Statistics, Arlington, VA 22230.

This 11th in a series of biennial reports documents both short- and long-term trends in the participation of women, minorities, and persons with disabilities in science and engineering education and employment. The previous edition (NSF/SRS 2000) examined changes in participation since the first report in the series was released in 1982. That report found that many of the findings of the 1982 report continued to be the case in 2000, including the relatively small percentages of women and minorities who earn S&E degrees and who are employed in S&E, the concentration of women and minorities in specific fields, the higher rates of part-time employment and unemployment for women than for men, the lower salaries earned by women than by men, the lower salaries earned by minorities than by whites, and the lower percentages of women than of men in full professorships.

The new report finds differences between men and women and among racial/ethnic groups in high school completion rates, college enrollment rates, field choice, employment, rank and tenure status, salaries, and work activities. Although women are more likely than men to complete high school and to enroll in college, they are less likely than men to choose S&E fields--at all levels of education and in employment. Within science and engineering, women are more prevalent in some fields--psychology, the social sciences, and the biological sciences--than others. Women are more likely than men to be employed part time and to be unemployed; women doctoral scientists and engineers employed in educational institutions are less likely than men to be tenured or to have the rank of full professor, and women scientists and engineers receive lower salaries than men. …

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