Academic journal article Bulletin of the World Health Organization

Islamic States Renew Commitment to Eradicate Polio

Academic journal article Bulletin of the World Health Organization

Islamic States Renew Commitment to Eradicate Polio

Article excerpt

The Organization of the Islamic Conference (O1C) adopted a new resolution on 20 October 2003 urging Member States which are still polio-endemic to accelerate their efforts to drive out the disease. The resolution has come at a critical time fur the Global Polio Eradication Initiative. Six of the world's seven remaining countries that are still polio-endemic are OIC Member States--Afghanistan, Egypt, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, and Somalia.

Adopted by the 57 OIC member countries during the 10th Session of the Islamic Conference in the Malaysian city of Putrajaya, the resolution also called on the international community--including OIC Member States--to urgently come up with the necessary funds to stop transmission completely by the end of 2004.

This landmark resolution has been welcomed by the Global Polio Eradication Initiative, a partnership spearheaded by WHO, Rotary International, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF). Since 1988, when the Global Polio Eradication Initiative was launched, significant progress has been made and today, only seven countries in the world remain polio-endemic: Afghanistan, Egypt, India, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, and Somalia. The number of polio cases has been reduced from greater than 350 000 in 1988 to 520 reported cases in 2003 (as of 12 November 2003), representing a greater than 99% reduction.

"This statement by the OIC is extremely important at this stage of the eradication effort," said Dr Hussein A. Gezairy, Regional Director of WHO~ Eastern Mediterranean Region. "This commitment is vital to wiping out this terrible disease in the remaining endemic OIC countries."

The resolution follows concerns raised at the World Health Assembly in May 2003 by many OIC countries about the risk ongoing transmission anywhere poses to polio-free countries. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.