Academic journal article Bulletin of the World Health Organization

Climate Change to Increase Incidence of Diseases

Academic journal article Bulletin of the World Health Organization

Climate Change to Increase Incidence of Diseases

Article excerpt

Climate change is likely to increase the global incidences of diseases such as malaria, diarrhoea and malnutrition around the world, according to a new study examining the health impacts of climate change launched by WHO and partners on 11 December.

Climate Change and Human Health--Risks and Responses, was launched at the 9th Session of the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change in Milan, Italy. It examines how weather, air pollution and water and food contamination affect the way diseases emerge and represents the most recently available scientific data on the issue.

"There is growing evidence that changes in the global climate will have profound effects on the health and wellbeing of citizens in countries throughout the world. We must better understand the potential health effects particularly for those who are most vulnerable, so that we can better manage the risks," said Dr Kerstin Leitner, WHO Assistant Director-General for Sustainable Development and Healthy Environments.

Climate change is responsible for 2.4% of all cases of diarrhoea and for 2% of all cases of malaria worldwide according to the most recently available figures; if global temperatures increase by up to three degrees Celsius, several hundred million more people will be exposed to malaria every year. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.