Academic journal article Journal of Technology and Teacher Education

Reflection through the ID-PRISM: A Teacher Planning Tool to Transform Classrooms into Web-Enhanced Learning Environments

Academic journal article Journal of Technology and Teacher Education

Reflection through the ID-PRISM: A Teacher Planning Tool to Transform Classrooms into Web-Enhanced Learning Environments

Article excerpt

     Recent books and articles are full of definitions of the ideal
     electronic classroom, prescriptions of how to use world wide web
     (www or web) resources, and descriptions of the effects of such
     resources on teaching practices and learning. Yet Becker (1999)
     found that only 30% of those teachers who were internet-connected
     acknowledged using web resources with their students. Instructional
     Design-Possibilities, Realities, Issues, Standards, and
     Multidimensional perspectives (ID-PRISM) was developed as a
     reflection tool to help the remaining teachers move through the
     stages of innovation by prompting them to think about
     possibilities, realities, issues, standards and multidimensional
     perspectives of teaching and learning to create an action plan for
     transforming their classroom into a web-enhanced learning
     environment. Rich reflection and web integration research provided
     the foundation for ID-PRISM. This article discusses this literature
     and the tool itself. It then concludes with an example and a
     recommended inservice program using ID-PRISM.

     "... school districts have chosen to ignore the essential human
     elements in the process of effectively integrating technology into
     the curriculum." (Farenga & Joyce, 2001, p. 317.)

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Jl. of Technology and Teacher Education (2003) 11(3), 347-375

The availability of internet technologies has reached deep into the educational system with teachers being the real gatekeepers of their impact on teaching and learning. Access to the Internet has been accelerated by national mandates and State legislation requiring internet access for all students in the K-12 educational arena. Individual schools are beginning to develop technology infrastructures that rival corporate training studios. Through national and state funding, this evolution holds promise for new ways of teaching and learning. However, stories abound about how computers sit idle or are used for glorified seatwork. With this evolution come several questions that must be addressed to prevent unused, misused, or underused technology in the classroom. How do teachers create a world wide web (www or web)-enhanced learning environment that effectively integrates teaching objectives and learning with technology resources? (e.g., what are the possibilities?) What school-level support structures are in place to facilitate the development of web-enriched classrooms? (e.g., what are the realities of the school environment?) Which teaching and learning issues can be addressed through strategic integration of technology? (e.g., how does technology integration affect students and teachers?) Research has indicated that providing scaffolds for teachers to reflect on these educational issues can help them move through the stages of innovation and thereby reach beyond the walls of the classroom for new instructional resources that will enhance teaching and learning. This is the premise upon which this article and the Instructional Design-Possibilities, Realities, Issues, Standards, and Multidimensional perspectives (ID-PRISM) were based.

An Argument for a Web-Enhanced Learning Environment in the Classroom

Today, internet technology is being used to enable the integration of web resources to enhance the interactive and social nature of instruction. Recently, researchers have investigated inter-, intra- and extranet interactive learning strategies (Geyer, 1997), interactive collaboration with scientists (Federman & Edwards, 1997), electronic discussion groups (Karayan & Crowe, 1997; Papert, 1997), Multiuser Object-Oriented virtual spaces for sharing ideas and developing solutions to problems (Conlon, 1997), electronic learning communities (Lieberman, 1996), and general use of internet resources in the classroom (Koszalka, 1999). This research is rich. Findings suggested that these interactive learning strategies engaged learners more fully in instruction and facilitated their ability to comprehend and construct personal knowledge. …

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