Academic journal article Issues in Accounting Education

Management Accounting

Academic journal article Issues in Accounting Education

Management Accounting

Article excerpt

ANTHONY A. ATKINSON, ROBERT S. KAPLAN, and S. MARK YOUNG, Management Accounting, Fourth Edition (Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall, 2004, pp. vii, 598).

The authors' stated philosophy of this text's fourth edition is "to highlight the strategic and operational uses of Management Accounting Information" (xix). Like its predecessor, this text focuses on uses of accounting information. As in the earlier editions, the authors continue to emphasize how to use measurement and management systems for value creation. The text's topical coverage is almost identical to that of other competitive Management Accounting textbooks. However, there are few exceptions worth noting. First, unlike most management accounting books, Atkinson, Kaplan, and Young (AKY) cover time-driven activity-based costing. Second, they present a new treatment of measuring and managing customer profitability drawn from "Measuring and Managing Customer Profitability" by Kaplan and Narayanan. Third, they include a new discussion on diagnostic and interactive control systems. Fourth, they introduce new materials on ratio analysis and balanced scorecard. Finally, they present new materials on ethics and the issues facing management accountants. Most other changes in this edition consist of revisions to a large number of exercises and problems as well as several new scenarios and real-world examples.

The text contains 12 chapters. Following an introduction about the nature, focus, and scope of management accounting, they discuss cost of products and how costs change over product life cycle. Chapters 3 and 4 include the approaches the managers use to compute the costs of their products and services. Chapters 5, 6, 7, and 11 provide discussions on how managers use costs for planning and decision making. Chapters 8, 9, 10, 12 focus on profit planning and evaluation. Additionally, these chapters discuss how managers manage and control organizational behavior through organizational design, and how cost and performance information forms the management control process. …

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