Academic journal article Notes

Notes for Notes

Academic journal article Notes

Notes for Notes

Article excerpt

The Music Library Association has announced its publication awards for 2002. The Vincent H. Duckles Award for the best book-length bibliography or other research tool in music published in 2002 was presented to Sabina Teller Ratner for Camille Saint-Saens, 1835-1921: A Thematic Catalogue of His Complete Works, vol. 1: The Instrumental Works (New York: Oxford University Press, 2002). The MLA Publications Awards Committee noted that "Sabina Teller Ratner's meticulous investigation into the instrumental work of Camille Saint-Saens is executed skillfully in the first of three planned volumes.... Thorough study of manuscripts, editions, transcriptions, correspondence and secondary literature can be evidenced in the description of each work. Yet, the seeming simplicity and the clarity of the volume's design belie the years of archival research Ratner conducted and the countless details contained in each annotation. This publication should serve as a model for future efforts throughout our field." The Eva Judd O'Meara Award for best review published in Notes in 2002 was presented to Tamara Levitz for her review of Untwisting the Serpent: Modernism in Music, Literature, and Other Arts by Daniel Albright (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2000); and Revealing Masks: Exotic Influences and Ritualized Performance in Modernist Music Theater by W. Anthony Sheppard, California Studies in 20th-Century Music (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2001) which appeared in Notes 58, no. 3 (March 2002): 556-60. The committee stated "In her review, Tamara Levitz has faced the question: how do we judge new approaches to the aesthetics of twentieth-century music? She has welcomed the attempt to forge new methods of analyzing and interpreting music, delighting with her authors when their proposed methodologies provide felicitous insights into specific musical works. At the same time, she has held the authors to the highest criteria of critical inquiry, observing when analogies and analyses become deceptively simple and expecting new methodologies to take existing historical documentation into account. Levitz brings to her work an intimate knowledge of many of the individual musical works discussed by each author, as well as a wide-ranging understanding of the larger concepts and issues of twentieth-century musical aesthetics. In turning an encouraging and critical eye to these two books, Levitz has challenged us to expect the highest standards from those who would create aesthetic theories of twentieth-century music." The Richard S. Hill Award for best article on music librarianship or article of a music-bibliographic nature was not awarded for 2002.

Other MLA Awards. There were three recipients of the Dena Epstein Award for Library and Archival Research in American Music. Kati Agocs's project is to write an introduction and prepare a critical edition of Leopold Damrosch's Symphony in A Major (1878) for publication in the series Recent Researches in American Music (A-R Editions). The manuscript is housed in The Juilliard School's Lila Acheson Wallace Library, and the Epstein Award will fund a research trip to work with Damrosch manuscripts at the Library of Congress. The second winner, Jane Ellsworth, will trace the history of the clarinet in early America from its appearance in the late 1750s to 1820. She is focusing on major East-Coast cities of colonial America such as Boston, Philadelphia, New York, Baltimore, and Charleston. Ellsworth has already researched Philadelphia and Baltimore, and her Epstein Award will offset the expenses of archival research at the South Carolina Historical Society and the Charleston Library Society in Charleston, South Carolina. Catherine Smith, the third recipient of the Epstein Award, is preparing a one-volume biography of William Grant Still to be published by the University of Illinois Press. Smith is a noted Still scholar and an experienced biographer. The Epstein Award will facilitate a research trip to the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, to use the William Grant Still and Verna Arvey Papers held in the Department of Special Collections. …

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