Academic journal article Journal of Environmental Health

Cryptosporidiosis Outbreak in a Recreational Swimming Pool in Minnesota

Academic journal article Journal of Environmental Health

Cryptosporidiosis Outbreak in a Recreational Swimming Pool in Minnesota

Article excerpt

* The Olmsted County Public Health Department received a call from a mother concerned that her child had a foodborne illness.

* Other people who had eaten at a banquet also were ill.

* A foodborne outbreak was ruled out, however.

* Investigators learned that all of the ill people were frequent swimmers at a local swimming pool.

* The long duration of illness also raised suspicions that Cryptosporidium was a possible agent.

* Cryptosporidiosis transmission occurs with ingestion of water contaminated with Cryptosporidium oocysts.

* Infection is spread by the fecal-oral route via the ingestion of oocysts excreted in human or animal feces.

* The oocysts are highly resistant to chemical disinfectants, including chlorine.

* They have an incubation period of up to two weeks in the gastrointestinal tract.

* Infection can occur even when small quantities of oocysts are ingested.

* Cryptosporidium infection occurs frequently in young children, with a peak incidence in children between one and five years of age.

* Symptoms can range from nausea and watery diarrhea to malabsorption and weight loss in severe cases.

* In immunocompetent people, the disease is usually self-limiting, with full recovery after 10 to 14 days.

* People with a compromised immune system may have a more prolonged period of diarrhea, leading to malnutrition and increased morbidity and mortality.

* To date, no effective pharmacotherapy exists. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.