Academic journal article Research-Technology Management

"America's Best and Brightest Are Leaving ... and Taking the Creative Economy with Them."

Academic journal article Research-Technology Management

"America's Best and Brightest Are Leaving ... and Taking the Creative Economy with Them."

Article excerpt

"America's Best and Brightest Are Leaving ... and Taking the Creative Economy with Them"; Richard Florida; Across the Board, Sept./Oct. 2004, pp. 34-40.

As the outsourcing of U.S. jobs continues, America is also experiencing the exodus of many of its most creative business, research, and academic minds to other countries, asserts Richard Florida, Hirst Professor of Public Policy at George Mason University and author of The Rise of the Creative Class. Florida says that as a result of this exodus, high-end, high-margin creative industries that used to be the United States' province and a crucial source of prosperity have begun to move overseas. Other countries, such as Ireland, are becoming more competitively creative at a faster rate than the United States.

"For the first time in modern memory, top scientists and intellectuals from elsewhere are choosing not to come to the U.S.," Florida says. "The altered flow of talent--aided by more stringent security measures--is already beginning to show signs of crimping the scientific process."

Cities in other parts of the world are outscoring American cities on measures of new talent, diversity and brainpower, he says. Brussels is fast becoming a creative-class center to rival Boston, Seattle and Austin. Vancouver and Toronto are also set to take off: both city--regions have a higher concentration of immigrants to help drive their creative economies than do New York, Miami or Los Angeles. …

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