Academic journal article Quebec Studies

Editor's Note

Academic journal article Quebec Studies

Editor's Note

Article excerpt

In this issue, we begin what we hope will be a series of re-assessments of the Quiet Revolution, its origins and impact on Quebec life. Historiography has become one of the liveliest areas of Quebec scholarship in recent years. While revisionist accounts of everything from the genealogy of the "nation" to the "normality" of Quebec's historical development in relation to other North American or European societies continue to appear, historians are also taking a step back from these debates to look at the history of the quarrels themselves as a phenomenon worthy of investigation and reflection. In this issue we offer two complementary contributions to a rethinking of the Quiet Revolution and its aftermath which derive from a conference held at Plattsburgh State University on the initiative of Donald Cuccioletta and Martin Lubin. First, Brian Tanguay explores the neglected role of labor in recent accounts of the Quiet Revolution's origins. Joseph LeMay then surveys the changes that have occurred since 1960 in the business environment of Quebec's smallar cities, which also tend to be neglected in the understandable focus on the more familiar case of Montreal.

Two articles reach further back into Quebec's cultural past. Lisa Gasbarrone examines some of the narrative strategies of F. …

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