Academic journal article Journal of Environmental Health

Sanitarians' Work with Indoor-Tanning Businesses: Findings from Interviews in Two Major Metropolitan Areas

Academic journal article Journal of Environmental Health

Sanitarians' Work with Indoor-Tanning Businesses: Findings from Interviews in Two Major Metropolitan Areas

Article excerpt

* Accumulating evidence points to a probable link between indoor tanning and skin cancer.

* Acute health risks from tanning devices include

-- erythema (skin burn),

-- corneal burns,

-- immunosuppression,

-- photosensitivity,

-- allergic reactions, and

-- eye infections.

* Indoor tanning is regulated at the federal, state, and local levels.

* FDA regulations primarily apply to manufacturers.

* They include requirements for

-- equipment and eyewear performance,

-- equipment labels, and

-- compatibility of lamps with equipment.

* By contrast, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) prohibits deceptive or misleading claims about the safety of indoor tanning.

* At least 27 states have indoor-tanning statutes, including Minnesota and Massachusetts.

* Previous studies have reported poor business compliance with federal and state indoor-tanning laws.

* Most indoor-tanning facilities do not effectively police themselves, especially in terms of youth access laws.

* A study was undertaken of awareness and practices among sanitarians with respect to indoor tanning.

* Interviews were conducted with sanitarians in Minnesota (the Twin Cities area) and Massachusetts (the Boston area).

* The regulations that respondents mentioned most frequently pertained to sanitation, equipment specifications, and posting of warnings.

* In Minnesota, 78 percent of respondents mentioned regulations regarding protective eyewear. …

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