Academic journal article Learning Disability Quarterly

The Future of Learning Disabilities

Academic journal article Learning Disability Quarterly

The Future of Learning Disabilities

Article excerpt

The field of learning disabilities (LD) is young, and the field is changing. Its formal beginning is popularly considered to be its naming by Samuel Kirk at the start of the 1960s. The field is many things. It is the concept of LD itself. It is assessment and identification. And it is service delivery. Further, the significance of LD extends beyond education into the worlds of work and daily living.

The field's relative youth and its many facets are obvious reasons for change. Any theory, institution, or enterprise is bound to evolve, grow, and define itself with time, especially one that was named and immediately pressed into action.

The changes the field of LD faces in 2005 are not minor. In the scale of history they may be of little note nor long remembered, but they will decide the future of the young field of LD. The lesson of history, including the history of thought, is that change is inevitable. Some say "change is good." No matter how it is valued, change is afoot for the field of LD. Thus, this issue of the Learning Disability Quarterly looks to the past in considering the future. …

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