Academic journal article Social Education

Bandwidth Problems Ca. 1912: The Need for Federal Regulation

Academic journal article Social Education

Bandwidth Problems Ca. 1912: The Need for Federal Regulation

Article excerpt

In the United States the use of wireless radio initially was unregulated-anyone could operate a radio transmitter anywhere, at any time, on any wavelength. And most utilized the longwave signals that traveled so well across land and sea. Naturally, severe interference occurred with everyone trying to use the same wavelengths. Eventually it was decided to do something about this, and because the individuals involved were working for the United States government, the action took the form of An Act to Regulate Radio Communication, passed by the U.S. Congress on August 13,1912.

A year earlier, a Radio Service had been established in the Department of Commerce and Labor's Bureau of Navigation. It was initially charged with making sure ships carried wireless equipment. With the passage of the 1912 law, the job of licensing stations and operators was added to the Radio Service's duties. The country was divided into nine radio inspection districts (below), with a district headquarters for a Radio Inspector set up at a major port within each district. Initially, radio was dominated by ship-to-ship and ship-to-shore stations, plus amateurs who comprised the bulk of the land stations. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.