Academic journal article Academic Exchange Quarterly

Service-Learning

Academic journal article Academic Exchange Quarterly

Service-Learning

Article excerpt

In this issue on service-learning, authors describe teaching/learning/service processes embedded in programs of study incorporating service-learning in diverse contexts. These programs offer powerful possibilities for students to develop new attitudes and skills, and the articles provide an overview of student outcomes vis-a-vis academic achievement, appreciation of diversity and personal/professional development. Institutional changes resulting from service-learning's impacts include the increased linkage between discrete courses, faculty/student involvement. While many of these articles describe service-learning's impacts on undergraduate students some of them describe graduate level projects, (e.g., scholars from the University of Georgia, describes the potential for service-learning to enhance the role of doctoral programs of study in preparing professional scholars for today's complex workforce).

Service-learning holds great potential for allowing students to play a key role in developing ethical programs and projects that provide benefits for communities as well. The article from the University of Utah discuss the role of service-learning in enabling young students to develop a high school project aimed at improving the community's environmental health, emphasizing community health impacts, public awareness, and policy recommendations to promote change. Drake University scholars describe a project that helps graduate students to investigate the impacts of "digital citizenship" in a service-learning laboratory. International contexts for engaging students in service-learning are discussed in the articles from Georgia and Pace. The authors from these institutions describe the process of developing intentional, integrated programs of studies in the international context. Their papers describe the transformational model, with improved learning outcomes and positive impacts for student participants.

Finally, some of the potential problems associated with service-learning are defined and described from both sides of the debate by Whitfield. …

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