Academic journal article Australian Journal of Language and Literacy

Editors' Introduction

Academic journal article Australian Journal of Language and Literacy

Editors' Introduction

Article excerpt

Issue 26:1, the first for 2003, was intended to be a generalist issue with no particular focus. However it has emerged as an interesting reflection of current trends in literacy teaching and research. Each article, to some extent, considers discourse or multiliteracies in various contexts. Another common feature is that most of the authors are from Queensland and some of these describe features of literacy instruction in that state, such as New Basics and Rich Tasks.

Mary Ryan and Michele Anstey show how a research project in one area branched out to investigate how teachers can develop pedagogies to enable students to use their sociocultural knowledge and their 'knowledge about reading' in order to become strategic readers. Using the Four Resources Model to examine how readers make use of available and appropriate resources the data reveals interesting implications for teaching. The multiliteracy pedagogy of Situated Practice, Overt Instruction, Critical Framing and Transformed Practice is used as a framework for an effective approach.

Barry Osborne and Eric Wilson write from a completely different multiliteracies context with their research set in the Torres Straits Islands. They describe, entertainingly, a piece of real life learning where students work in English and their first language to create a culturally appropriate radio commercial on diabetes, which is endemic in the region. While the schools involved are not part of the trialling group for the New Basics, what they achieve is an outstanding example of New Basics and Rich Tasks. In assisting Indigenous students to master Standard Australian English the project used cooperative learning, high expectations and constant use of language for real purposes, all of which are part of culturally relevant pedagogy. The final result demonstrates that these Indigenous students are literate in both their first language and English (which may be a second or third language) when assessed across a range of literacies. …

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