Academic journal article Environmental Health Perspectives

The Role of the Parent in Deterring Child Smoking, as Seen by Rural Native American and White Parents

Academic journal article Environmental Health Perspectives

The Role of the Parent in Deterring Child Smoking, as Seen by Rural Native American and White Parents

Article excerpt

Kegler MC, Malcoe LH. 2005. Anti-smoking socialization beliefs among rural Native American and white parents of young children. Health Educ Res 20(2):175-184.

Studies suggest that there are differences between the races in parental "antismoking Socialization"--that is, how parents influence their children's expectations regarding the feasibility, acceptability, and consequences of smoking cigarettes. For instance, black parents are more likely than white parents to set ground rules regarding tobacco use for their children, and are less likely to assume that teens will inevitably experiment with smoking. Now Lorraine Halinka Malcoe and NIEHS grantee Michelle C. Kegler of Emory University have compared antismoking socialization beliefs among rural white and Native American parents. Better information on how beliefs vary racially could help shape more effective ways of teaching parents to deter their children from smoking.

Teen smoking rates vary significantly between racial and ethnic groups. According to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for the year 2000, 31.8% of white high school students reported smoking in the past 30 days. Hispanic students were next at 22.6%, followed by Asian Americans at 20.6%, and blacks at 16.8%. Data on smoking among Native American teenagers are not as readily available, but some studies have indicated the rate among Native Americans overall is comparable to or higher than that of whites. …

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