Academic journal article Ethics & International Affairs

The Revival of Empire

Academic journal article Ethics & International Affairs

The Revival of Empire

Article excerpt

The term "empire" has recently gained new currency throughout the world. The books of that name by Antonio Negri and Michael Hardt, and by Niall Ferguson; Andrew Bacevich's American Empire; the full-throated endorsement of "American empire" by the influential Weekly Standard; Michael Ignatieff's more hesitant embrace of it in the New York Times Magazine; and an extended treatment in the Wilson Quarterly are among its most prominent recent instances in American public and academic discourse. They are also suggestive of the diversity of meanings and associations this term now carries. For some it is a denunciatory word, for others a hortatory one. Some consider empire as an accurate and evocative description of American unipolarity, while for others it describes an emerging global order that no single nation directs.

The revival of empire as an organizing idea for evaluating contemporary institutions and policies raises important questions. Some of these are conceptual: What does "empire" mean in terms of social arrangements or relations among political societies? Does it have a unified and coherent meaning, or is it a "blur"--a vague and messy concept that runs together several distinct ideas and often carries misleading associations? Is it purely descriptive, so that we can identify empires without passing judgment on them? Or does the correct application of the term, like coercion, democracy, and liberty, depend on evaluative judgments? …

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