Academic journal article Monthly Labor Review

Immigrants of New York

Academic journal article Monthly Labor Review

Immigrants of New York

Article excerpt

Although Ellis Island is today just a national park, New York is still a city very much affected by immigration. In "New York City Immigrants: The 1990s Wave," the June 2005 title in the Federal Reserve Bank of New York series of Current Issues in Economics and Finance, Rae Rosen, Susan Wieler, and Joseph Pereira outline the impact immigration has had on the City's population and labor force in the 2000 census.

In the decade just preceding the decennial census, 1.2 million foreign immigrants very nearly replaced the 1.3 million residents who left New York for nearby counties or other States. Over the years, that "cycling" of migration resulted in foreign-born persons making up fully 45 percent of New York City's adult population. Obviously, such a large group has a significant impact on the characteristics of the population and labor force; that impact reflects a remarkable diversity in the characteristics of recent immigrants.

Rosen, Wieler, and Pereira find, for example, that "although the 1990s adult immigrants are on the whole better educated than foreign-born city residents who arrived in earlier decades, they tend to cluster at opposite ends of the education spectrum." New arrivals from Latin America, the Caribbean, or Mexico may often have limited English or be without a high school diploma. …

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