Academic journal article The Journal of African American History

Edna Beatrice Chappell McKenzie, Ph.D

Academic journal article The Journal of African American History

Edna Beatrice Chappell McKenzie, Ph.D

Article excerpt

Vivacious, effervescent, generous--these are the words that come to mind when we think of Dr. Edna Chappell McKenzie who passed away on 26 June 2005. Dr. McKenzie's smile was legendary, as was her seriousness about things that were important to her.

Born in Grindstone, Fayette County, Pennsylvania, on 29 December 1923, one of the seven children of Rev. Settie and Beatrice Hendricks Chappell, she finished high school and came to Pittsburgh in the 1940s where she met and later married Edmund R. McKenzie, Sr. Edna Chappell McKenzie had two careers, and numerous avocations, and she was serious about them all. As a journalist on the Pittsburgh Courier in the 1940s, she moved from the "Society Column" to serious news stories and earned a reputation for truthfulness in reporting on issues and activities important in the lives of African Americans. She won praise and made history for her exposes on the discrimination against African Americans in public accommodations, employment, and housing in western Pennsylvania.

As an accomplished reporter, the transition to historian came naturally and she eventually became the first black woman to receive a doctorate in history from the University of Pittsburgh. In her second career as a historian and college professor, Dr. McKenzie served on the faculty of the Community College of Allegheny for over 23 years where she taught American and African American history. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.