Academic journal article Science Scope

What a Relief: Using Paper Relief Sculpture to Teach Topographic Map Skills

Academic journal article Science Scope

What a Relief: Using Paper Relief Sculpture to Teach Topographic Map Skills

Article excerpt

Byline: Kelly Price

While the struggle persists in science classes to help students visualize in three dimensions, art classes are creating unique sculptures out of paper that produce three-dimensional displays from two-dimensional resources. The translation of paper relief sculpting from the art classroom to the science classroom adds dimension to the teaching of topography.

Materials and procedures

Students should begin this activity with a photocopy of the topographic map section that they plan to sculpt. Topographic maps may be obtained through a variety of sources. Many textbook resources for Earth science classes include topographic map activities. You may research topographic maps on the internet or you may create your own map showing contour intervals. Using scissors, the students should cut around the base layer of their map following the contour lines. The students use this cutout as a pattern for making their first contour interval section. They should trace the pattern onto the paper and cut it out. Once this section is cut out, it should be taped flat to a whole sheet of paper, cardboard, or other stiff material that will serve as the base of their sculpture. Once the first section is secured, the students should cut their pattern around the second contour line and remove the outermost contour interval. …

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