Academic journal article Library Technology Reports

Preface

Academic journal article Library Technology Reports

Preface

Article excerpt

It has been three years since the publication of "Metadata and Its Applications" (Library Technology Reports, September/October 2002, 38:5). Metadata was still a new buzzword that many librarians did not understand--or it was one they chose to ignore. Many of us were just beginning to explore the world of digitization projects, and so we were getting our first taste of working with Dublin Core or some other metadata standard. Because of the competition metadata posed to technical services librarians' beloved MARC and AACR2--and because it challenged them to look at information organization and description in different ways--metadata was a hot topic among this set of librarians. Resources on metadata standards were few and far between, and the 2002 edition was more of an introduction to what metadata was all about, a report on general resources available on the topic, and served as a concise and quick guide to the most important metadata schemas available or in progress at that time. This new edition of "Metadata and Its Applications" is both a revision and an update. It is not going to rehash old material; in other words, it is not meant to be a comprehensive overview of current metadata standards.

This new edition is meant to be more of a supplement to the previous issue. There's a general resources section (Chapter I) that focuses on current and up-to-date information on metadata, as well as updates and materials on the major metadata standards (the ones that have survived). More importantly, the focus of this report will be on new metadata standards, new collaborations, and new directions in information organization and retrieval in this increasingly electronic world of ours.

What are some of the new directions that have emerged regarding metadata in the last three years? Here's a brief glimpse:

* More libraries have advertised for jobs titled "Metadata Librarian." This new type of position usually seeks expertise in non-MARC metadata standards, experience with digitization and digital projects, and the ability to collaborate and coordinate projects and personnel both inside and outside of the library. Leadership, initiative, innovation, and management skills are usually required as well.

* There is more discussion on alternative MARC-based metadata schema within librarianship (MODS, METS, MADS, MARCXML, etc.). At the same time, however, MARC-based metadata is not even being discussed by those involved in metadata standards in corporate/business environments. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.