Academic journal article Journal of Secondary Gifted Education

From the Editor

Academic journal article Journal of Secondary Gifted Education

From the Editor

Article excerpt

This issue emphasizes students' stories--from the stories of students based on their perceptions of different classes (Gentry and Owen), to the stories of two students learning mathematics in different ways (Hekimoglu). We hear the story of one very special student who has a gift and a learning disability and how he found a way to award-winning achievement (Neu, Baum, and Cooper). Finally, we have the story, found unpublished in the archives of E. Paul Torrance's work, of two groups of adults who were predicted to be creative from childhood.

All of the articles in this issue compare characteristics of gifted students with characteristics and experiences of nongifted students. Throughout this issue, we are reminded of the need for special curricula and environments for exceptional students. Each study seems to echo the notion, stated clearly in Torrance's study, that high ability combined with extraordinary domain-related skills are not enough in and of themselves for an individual to reach his or her full potential. The idea is reinforced that high-ability students need an appropriate environment, which is different from what may be appropriate for the majority of students. They also need a clear vision, or crystallizing moment, that brings an internal vision and drive in order to live up to their full potential.

Each comparative study approaches this prospect from a different angle. In "Creative Achievements of the Sociometric Stars in a 30-Year Study," Torrance compares "sociometric stars," people whose high school peers thought they would achieve, with those he called "the beyonders" to discover what made the difference between their levels of creative fulfillment. He found both internal and external forces that could drive a person to greatness or could limit that person's life's work.

Both Hekimoglu's and Gentry and Owen's studies compare gifted students with regular students in the school setting. In "Conducting a Teaching Experiment With a Gifted Student," Hekimoglu compares "gifted" and "average" students in an isolated setting to explore relative characteristics, determining that the needs of the two kinds of students are as different as their abilities. …

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