Academic journal article Canadian Journal of History

A Note from the Editor

Academic journal article Canadian Journal of History

A Note from the Editor

Article excerpt

In March 1966, the History Department of the University of Saskatchewan issued the first number of a new academic periodical. Contained in its 128 pages were three full-length articles--one on the fifteenth-century papacy, another on fin-de-siecle socialism in France, and the third on British India's frontier zone--a research note about a Gestapo report on Pope Pius XII, and thirty-four book reviews. Thus did the Canadian Journal of History/Annales canadiennes d'histoire come into being.

Ever since, at a rate of two, then three issues per year, the CJH/ACH has continued to advance the cause of general historical scholarship, both in Canada and beyond its borders. The issue you now hold in your hands brings to a close our fortieth year of publication, a milestone that we feel calls for some celebration, especially considering how it coincides with the centennial of Saskatchewan, the Journal's birthplace and home province. Accordingly, we have included a few special features in this, our anniversary issue. Two of the CJH/A CH's former editors, Hugh Johnson and Michael Hayden, have contributed their views on the historical profession in Canada and the Journal's place in it. In addition, two special guests--Governor General's Award-winning author Guy Vanderhaeghe and eminent broadcast journalist and news anchor Lloyd Robertson--have agreed to write about how their appreciation for and understanding of history has shaped their outlooks and careers. We are deeply grateful to both of them for helping us to commemorate our anniversary.

From its inception, the CJH/ACH has endeavored to broaden the range of historical study in Canada. The original vision of the Journal's first editors--Ivo Lambi and his associates, Peter Bietenholz and Peter Marsh--was to afford Canadian scholars specializing in all fields of history greater opportunities to find a general academic audience and engage more fully with the work and ideas of their counterparts outside Canada. Such diversity, inclusiveness, and breadth of vision have always been at the heart of the Journal's activities. The CJH/ACH has also sought to make those principles work to the benefit of scholars-in-training; one of the Journal's signal contributions to the profession is our annual Graduate Student Essay Competition, conceived by editorial board member and several-times editor Chris Kent and inaugurated in 1991 under the editorship of Brett Fairbairn. …

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