Academic journal article T H E Journal (Technological Horizons In Education)

Package Increases Students' Access to CAD (Dalton College's Use of Autodesk Inc.'s AutoCAD and Generic CADD Computer-Aided Design Software Packages)

Academic journal article T H E Journal (Technological Horizons In Education)

Package Increases Students' Access to CAD (Dalton College's Use of Autodesk Inc.'s AutoCAD and Generic CADD Computer-Aided Design Software Packages)

Article excerpt

At Dalton College in Dalton, Ga., instructor Michael Jordan employs a variety of computer-aided design (CAD) software programs to give students more options when learning and using CAD technology.

Jordan teaches 15 different drafting courses at the Technical Division of Dalton College, a two-year unit of the university system of Georgia. His courses include engineering drafting, architectural and machine design, descriptive geometry and several CAD courses.

Since 1984, Jordan has employed AutoCAD, a 2D and 3D design and drafting program developed by Autodesk, Inc. located in Sausalito, Calif. This program has long been considered an industry standard by design professionals. While AutoCAD offers comprehensive capabilities for 2D and 3D design, it can also be an intimidating program for beginning and intermediate computer users to learn. And in many cases, AutoCAD is simply a more powerful drawing tool than many students need.

"We still rely heavily on AutoCAD's performance for 3D design work," Jordan says, "but so many of my students require only 2D drawing applications that we needed a simplified CAD program that would serve as a supplement to AutoCAD."

Complementing AutoCAD

In 1987, Jordan purchased a copy of Generic CADD, an affordable, easy-to-use, 2D design and drafting program also from AutoDesk. "Generic CADD gives us another avenue to approach design and drafting work. The program's economical price--about one-tenth the cost of AutoCAD--helps us stretch our limited school budget, and its easeof-use makes the program a popular choice for many students. It's a perfect complement to AutoCAD," he explains.

At least half of Jordan's students are professionals who work during the day and return to school at night to learn specific CAD applications relevant to their current positions. …

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