Academic journal article Communication Disorders Quarterly

Academic and Social Status of Hearing, Deaf, and Hard of Hearing Students Participating a Co-Enrolled Classroom

Academic journal article Communication Disorders Quarterly

Academic and Social Status of Hearing, Deaf, and Hard of Hearing Students Participating a Co-Enrolled Classroom

Article excerpt

The researchers examined the communication participation, academic achievement, and social behavior of five Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing (DHH) students, five DHH students with additional disabilities (DHH-D), and 18 nondisabled, hearing peers in a co-enrolled, Grade 3-4-5 combination classroom. DHH students were not significantly different from their hearing peers in communication participation and social behavior. Differences did exist in academic achievement, but DHH students made steady academic progress over 3 years. DHH-D students were significantly different from their hearing peers, but not from their DHH peers in all areas. The finding adds to the data indicating that co-enrollment is a possible model of inclusion for DHH students and also provides initial data about the functioning of DHH-D students.

**********

One of the debates among educators is whether placement in general education classrooms is beneficial academically and socially for students who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing (DHH) (Kluwin & Stinson, 1993). Research indicates that students who are DHH and who are educated in public schools have higher academic achievement scores than those educated in special schools, although the variance in achievement is as likely to be due to student characteristics as it is to educational placement (Allen, 1986). Students in public schools can attend regular classrooms, receive varying amounts of supplemental instruction from a teacher of DHH, or even be enrolled in a separate, self-contained class and receive most of their instruction from a teacher of DHH. For students in public schools, increased time in regular classrooms has been shown to increase academic achievement, presumably due to access to the general curriculum (Kluwin, 1993). At the same time, many students in public schools do not develop close relationships with their hearing peers (Stinson & Antia, 1999; Stinson & Kluwin, 1996) and they report feelings of loneliness. Despite the advantage in academic performance, the presence of social difficulties has led some educators to conclude that a segregated, self-contained, special school setting is a superior education environment to a public school setting because it meets the cultural and linguistic needs of students who are DHH (Baldwin, 1994).

Fortunately, placement in a self-contained or a regular public-school classroom is not the only option for DHH students. Co-enrolled (CE) classrooms represent a promising additional possibility for increasing student social access to peers, as well as increasing achievement (Kirchner, 1994; Kluwin, 1999; Kreimeyer, Crooke, Drye, Egbert, & Klein, 2000). ACE classroom typically consists of an approximately 2:1 ratio of hearing and DHH students. A team of two teachers, a general education teacher and a teacher of DHH students, collaborate to provide instruction. In many CE classrooms, the teachers and students frequently use both spoken English and sign language. Students who are DHH have the benefit of the presence of a teacher who is fluent in sign language, a general education teacher who is skilled in delivering grade-level curriculum, and access to both DHH and hearing peers. Stinson and Kluwin (2003) observed that CE programming "appears to work well with dedicated and motivated staff when there are sufficient numbers of deaf students to create a viable free-standing program" (Stinson & Kluwin, 2003; p. 59). Although CE programs appear to provide academic and social benefits to DHH students, Kluwin (1999) notes that insufficient data have been collected to demonstrate positive academic and social outcomes, and suggests that additional research is needed.

One purpose of this study is to document the performance of DHH students in a CE classroom in the areas of classroom communication participation, academic achievement, and social behavior. In addition, the research documents the performance of students who are DHH and are classified as having additional disabilities (DHH-D), specifically learning disabilities, language impairment, and mental retardation, and compares their performance with the performance of their DHH and hearing peers in the CE classroom. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.