Academic journal article Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport

Fitness

Academic journal article Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport

Fitness

Article excerpt

The Effects of Two Types of Required Physical Education

on Attitudes and Exercise Habits of College Alumni

The purpose of this study was to determine attitudes of college graduates about their general education physical education program and their current exercise habits. A representative sample (N = 549) of alumni from College A graduating between 1970 and 1970 was surveyed according to the procedures of Adams and Brynteson (1992). Alumni (N = 277) who graduated between 1970 and 1981 participated in a required basic physical education activity (PEA) program and alumni (N = 272) that graduated between 1984 and 1987 participated in a required concepts based physical activity (CPE) program. A one way MANOVA with five dependent measures indicated significant differences, F (5, 524) = 3.4259, p [less than or equal to] .005, existed among alumni who graduated from a required PEA program and those who graduated from a required CPE program on the dependent variables. Post hoc independent t tests revealed alumni who graduated from the CPE program placed significantly greater value on their college's PE program in terms of its contribution to their knowledge about fitness, attitudes toward fitness, and current exercise habits. When alumni activity was quantified according to aerobic points (Cooper, 1977), alumni that had participated in the CPE program earned statistically more aerobic points than alumni that graduated from the PEA program. To evaluate the effect of time, a comparable school (College B) was selected because its PE program had remained constant during the research time frame. The sample was subdivided into two time frame groups Group I and Group 2 similar to College A. Results of the one way MANOVA with five dependent measures for College B indicated no significant differences, F (5, 306) = 1.03212, p [less than or equal to] .399 between groups. It was concluded that alumni who graduated from a conceptually based physical education program: (1) placed significantly greater value on their college's PE program in terms of its contribution to their knowledge about fitness, attitudes towards fitness, and current exercise habits, and (2) were significantly more physically active as measured by earned aerobic points.

Physical Activity Patterns and Health-Related

Fitness Levels of British and Kuwaiti Boys

In England CHD accounts for 1/4 of all deaths; in Kuwait it accounts for a little more than 1/3 of all deaths. There is great interest in discovering the intricacies between disease, lifestyle, physical activity and health. The health status of a nation's youth is important, as the health of this group will directly effect future productivity. It is believed that physical education (PE) lessons could be used to introduce ideas regarding the interaction between physical activity and health. This study involved 170 British and 173 Kuwaiti 15 to 16 year old boys, chosen at random from within the public school systems of England and Kuwait. The students took part in a survey and health-related fitness tests. The standard deviation, mean, mode, percentile ranking, and significant difference (p [is less than] .05) of the two groups were calculated. Survey results indicated that more than half of the Kuwaiti boys were not involved in any physical activity other than PE; less than one quarter of the British boys were not involved in extra physical activity. Of the British 49% came to school walking or by bike; in contrast, 71% of the Kuwaitis came to school by car. Health-related fitness test results which strikingly corroborated the physical activity survey, were recorded on the one mile walk/ run; 31% (n = 47) of the British and 80% (n = 68) of the Kuwaiti subjects could not finish a mile in less than eight minutes. Although this is not a normative study, it does give some indications about the British and Kuwaiti boys, physical activity habits and health-related fitness levels. …

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