Academic journal article Australian Aboriginal Studies

Editors' Notes on Book Reviews in Two Previous Issues

Academic journal article Australian Aboriginal Studies

Editors' Notes on Book Reviews in Two Previous Issues

Article excerpt

Regarding Joyce Hudson's review, published in the last issue, of the Kaytetye picture dictionary (Myfany Turpin, Alison Ross, Kaytetye communities; IAD Press): The Press has advised that a CD normally accompanies the dictionary; but it was not provided to the review editor with the book, and so was not commented on by the reviewer.

Regarding the review article by Barbara Glowczewski of Piercing the ground (Christine Watson; Fremantle Arts Centre Press): The version published was the incorrect one; this was a production error.

Prompted by Margaret Bullen's review of Cairns and Harney's Dark sparklers (AAS 2004/1), Hugh Cairns writes to advise of a second printing:

   Dark sparklers, a presentation by Bill Harney of the night
   skies within the Wardaman Tradition, relayed by Dr
   Hugh Cairns in 2003, was revised and reprinted in June
   last year, and launched by the Hon. Ted Egan in
   Darwin.

      The review in AAS 2004/1 was apposite to the first
   printing, but, in the second, typographical errors have
   been removed, sky-maps are clearer, and there are a
   new photograph of rock-art and a new painting, and
   one page has been added where Bill Harney states that
   the message from the book is 'Caring for the country
   like the Creation People did, the mountains, rivers,
   landscape, plants, animals--our book's for people to
   understand how to care for the country...have a look
   anyway!'. When he coins his word 'cosmoscape' in this
   book we feel we are in valuable Aboriginal Tradition.

      Apropos the review, one paragraph needs
   elucidation. Bill Harney told Hugh Cairns that the
   relations of man and woman in Tradition had a deep
   learning function: the young man learns the women's
   life and culture (not sacred and/or secret details) from
   within the personal closeness and happiness of the
   ceremonially-arranged marriage with an older woman
   (normally a widow), and a girl would learn the man's
   culture from her first marriage too--language, story,
   ceremony, sexuality, practical survival skills and so on. … 
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