Academic journal article Monthly Labor Review

Long Island Rail Strike Ends

Academic journal article Monthly Labor Review

Long Island Rail Strike Ends

Article excerpt

A 2--1/2-year dispute that culminated in a 2-day work stoppage ended when negotiators for the Long Island Rail Road--the Nation's largest commuter rail service--and the United Transportation Union signed a 3-year collective bargaining agreement covering some 2,300 conductors, track and train workers, car repair workers, bartenders, and maintenance-of-way supervisors. The walkout affected some 107,000 Long Island, NY, commuters who use the system daily during rush hours.

The settlement was preceded by two Presidential emergency boards created within a 4-month period to hear the same dispute. (See Monthly Labor Review, March 1994, p. 43, and July 1994, pp. 53-54.) The boards were established under the emergency dispute procedures of the Railway Labor Act--the Federal law that regulates collective bargaining in the railroad industry--to make non-binding recommendations to resolve the impasse between the New York City area commuter rail carrier and the union. The dispute as presented to the original emergency board involved more than 100 work rules and a number of wage, pension, and health and welfare proposals.

The pact, which came quickly after railroad management realized that quick congressional intervention was not forthcoming, calls for wage increases of 8.7 percent over the term of the agreement, without the work rule changes proposed by management. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.