Academic journal article Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport

The Effects of Fitness and Fatness on Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and Self-Perception of Health in Urban Teenagers: The PATH Program

Academic journal article Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport

The Effects of Fitness and Fatness on Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and Self-Perception of Health in Urban Teenagers: The PATH Program

Article excerpt

Intervention strategies are crucial in planning school-based wellness programs. Understanding whether cardiovascular disease risk factors (RF) and self-perception of health (SPH) are affected by fitness or fatness can affect strategies. 865 girls and 497 boys were tested on body mass index (BMI), % body fat, triceps skinfold, waist girth (WG), systolic (Sp) and diastolic (Dp) blood pressure (mmHg), total cholesterol (C), physical inactivity (PI), cigarette smoking (S), SPH (self-reported health perception ranging from 1 to 9; 1 = lowest perception, 9 = highest), and maximal oxygen uptake (V[O.sub.2]) estimated from step test recovery heart rates. V[O.sub.2] was used for fitness and WG for fatness in fitness versus fatness comparisons. Four groups of fitness and fatness were established for girls and boys, respectively, representing upper and lower 30th percentiles of V[O.sub.2] and WG. Upper and lower 30th percentiles for V[O.sub.2] were > 36.3 and < 32.2 ml[O.sub.2] x kg x min (girls), and > 50.9 and < 42.5 ml[O.sub.2] x kg x min (boys). Corresponding criteria for WG were > 75.6 and < 66.0 cm (girls) and > 78.7 and < 70.5 cm (boys). Differences in Sp, Dp, PI, C, S, and SPH were compared by analysis of variance and Tukey between group multiple comparisons. Significant differences (p < .05) were observed for girls in Sp, Dp, and SPH. …

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