Academic journal article Environmental Health Perspectives

No Dental Dilemma for BPA

Academic journal article Environmental Health Perspectives

No Dental Dilemma for BPA

Article excerpt

Among the many uses of bisphenol A (BPA) is the manufacture of resin-based dental composites and sealants. Recently a team of researchers from the CDC sank their teeth into questions about whether BPA monomer leaching from sealants could be harmful to people. The results of their human study, presented in the March 2006 issue of the Journal of the American Dental Association, suggest that although leaching does occur, sealants are still a safe means of preventing dental cavities.

Low-level exposures to BPA monomer in pregnant rodents, at a level that humans could potentially receive from dental sealants, have been shown to disrupt reproductive development in their fetuses, and concerns have emerged about the possibility of human health effects from dental exposures. Scientific exploration of this question has yielded inconsistent results, says Renee Joskow, first author of the March paper. Much of this is due to limitations in laboratory detection and translation of animal studies to human health effects, as well as insufficiently addressing the parameters of exposure in a clinical dental setting.

The CDC team, led by Joskow (now of the U.S. Public Health Service) and Dana Barr, looked at 14 nonsmokers receiving their first resin-based sealants as part of their routine dental care. Each subject received one of two brands of dental sealant manufactured by two well-established dental equipment and material supply firms. …

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