Academic journal article Environmental Health Perspectives

Inadequate Housing May Put Immigrant Farmworkers at Risk

Academic journal article Environmental Health Perspectives

Inadequate Housing May Put Immigrant Farmworkers at Risk

Article excerpt

Even though rates of substandard housing for the general U.S. population are relatively low, percentages for subpopulations such as immigrants are disproportionately high. In this report NIEHS grantee Thomas A. Arcury and colleagues at Wake Forest University School of Medicine describe specific housing conditions for immigrant farmworker families in North Carolina, and identify housing features that leave the occupants vulnerable to environmental exposures.

Inadequate housing is a known contributor to poor health. Overcrowding and lack of proper sanitary facilities can lead to higher incidences of infectious disease, and substandard housing with structural or electrical problems poses the danger of physical injuries and exposure to toxic substances such as lead and polychlorinated biphenyls. Inadequate housing can also have negative effects on psychological health.

The researchers analyzed data from four surveys of North Carolina farmworker communities conducted in 2001 and 2003 by specially trained interviewers fluent in Spanish. From the survey responses, the researchers documented housing conditions for 234 households of immigrant Latino farmworkers, most of whom (90%) had immigrated from Mexico. All participating houses had at least one adult farmworker and one child. The investigators considered three main features in the participants' houses that could affect their health: characteristics of the dwelling itself, characteristics of the people comprising the household, and housekeeping behaviors. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.