Academic journal article Environmental Health Perspectives

Inflammatory Enzyme Modulates Motor Neuron Damage in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

Academic journal article Environmental Health Perspectives

Inflammatory Enzyme Modulates Motor Neuron Damage in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

Article excerpt

Approximately 30,000 patients in the United States currently have amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease. ALS is a progressive neuromuscular disease that weakens and eventually destroys motor neurons that connect the brain with the skeletal muscles. NIEHS grantee Serge Przedborski of Columbia University has pioneered the investigation of the molecular mechanisms leading to the death of neurons that occurs in ALS and Parkinson disease. Now Przedborski and colleagues provide new insights into the role of the enzyme NADPH oxidase in the death of motor neurons as a result of ALS.

ALS, the most common adult-onset paralytic disease, is most commonly diagnosed in middle age, and affects men more often than women. Patients gradually lose the ability to speak, swallow, and move voluntarily. Sensory function and intellectual ability are unaffected, and death usually results from loss of respiratory function. The disease affects all racial, socioeconomic, and ethnic groups, and the life expectancy of ALS patients is usually three to five years after diagnosis.

In this study, the investigators observed spinal cord tissue using a mouse histochemistry model, and created a timeline chronicling observed motor abnormality behavior in transgenic SOD1[. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.