Academic journal article Environmental Health Perspectives

Environmental Health Sciences Core Center Grants (P30)

Academic journal article Environmental Health Perspectives

Environmental Health Sciences Core Center Grants (P30)

Article excerpt

The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) invites applications from qualified institutions for support of the Environmental Health Sciences Core Centers. These centers are designed to build infrastructure in the field of environmental health sciences, including those needed to conduct basic, translational, clinical, and public health research. By facilitating the use of shared research resources that serve the research in the mission areas of the NIEHS, investigators who are associated with EHS Core Centers will be poised to lead the field in new and important directions. The mission of NIEHS is to improve human health by using environmental sciences to understand human biology and human disease.

A P30 Core Center grant is an institutional award, made in the name of a principal investigator, to bring together multidisciplinary groups of scientist to identify scientific opportunities and tackle compelling problems in environmental health sciences. By supporting centralized resources and facilities and fostering scientific exchange, new technologies and approaches can be brought to bear on new and existing research projects. The P30 Core Center grant is awarded competitively, initially for up to 4 years, and may be renewed for periods of up to 5 years. By providing a center structure and core resources, this support is intended to enhance the productivity of traditional research grants at the institution, focus investigators on environmental science issues relevant to human biology, human disease, and public health, and thereby improve the health of communities and the nation. A core center grant helps to integrate and promote research in existing projects and provides an administrative framework within one or several central themes; however, no funds are provided for direct support of research projects, except for pilot projects, recruitment of select new investigators, and research program development.

The core centers are expected to bring their efforts to identify promising opportunities for collaboration and support which would translate environmental health research and related basic science into domains that enhance our understanding of human disease and public health. The core center, thus, is charged with recognizing unique opportunities and capitalizing on them to foster scientific excellence using new methods, technologies, and novel scientific approaches that focus on using environmental science to understand human biology and human disease. The emphasis should be on fostering scientific excellence by providing resources and scientific interactions unlikely to be attained by individual investigators, promoting collaborations among basic biomedical and applied researchers, reaching out to innovative investigators in complementary fields, and facilitating cutting-edge research that addresses exposures and health issues in a timely manner.

In addition to direct research support services, the center should stimulate career development for future research leaders in environmental health sciences. This can include training and mentoring junior faculty in environmental health sciences, promoting interactions with established investigators in related disciplines, and helping young scientists and clinician-scientists to build foundations for careers in NIEHS-sponsored research. Investigators and trainees are encouraged to interact with NIEHS program officials with the goal of promoting grants-manship and eventual funding by NIEHS. NIEHS strongly encourages training and career development of women and underrepresented minorities.

Overall NIEHS expects that an EHS Core Center will: 1) provide intellectual leadership and innovation in basic science, translational and clinical sciences, and public health research in environmental health; 2) stimulate integration of basic and applied research to better understand the impact of environmental exposures on human disease; 3) facilitate and develop new interdisciplinary research strategies to advance the field; 4) incorporate novel technologies and methods into EHS research; 5) provide career development for future research leaders. …

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