Academic journal article Human Ecology Forum

Study Looks at Three Types of U.S. Child Care

Academic journal article Human Ecology Forum

Study Looks at Three Types of U.S. Child Care

Article excerpt

A team of international researchers is attempting to arrive at how child care options are affecting the development of children. As a model for their project, the researchers are using a U.S. day care study carried out by Marion Potts. Conducted in Broome County, New York, the study involved sixty-seven families and focused on three types of care: by mothers, by paid caregivers in the caregiver's home, and by group day care providers. The children and their families and caregivers were observed for a four-month period. Then after a two-year interval and the children were in public schools, the observations and interviews were repeated.

Fifteen types of child behaviors were tested for, including a range of cognitive and social categories. Caregiver behaviors were analyzed for initiation or control of these child behaviors and for the type of techniques used in eliciting desired outcomes.

Among the findings:

* Child behavior. Children in group day care, whether with education as a component or not (educational or custodial), proved to be more aggressive and assertive with their peers than those in paid home care or in full-time unpaid mother care. Children in custodial day care centers demonstrated more conformity to their peers than did those in educational center day care, paid home care, or mother care. Custodial day care children were also more cooperative with peers than children in mother care or paid home care, unlike children in educational center care, who showed no significant differences in cooperation from any others. …

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