Academic journal article Academy of Marketing Studies Journal

Differences in Charisma, Ethics, Personality, and Machiavellian Characteristics of Male and Female Marketing Students

Academic journal article Academy of Marketing Studies Journal

Differences in Charisma, Ethics, Personality, and Machiavellian Characteristics of Male and Female Marketing Students

Article excerpt

ABSTRACT

Developing a corporate culture that encourages ethical behavior and discourages unethical behavior has become a major concern for organizations. However, in discussing business ethics, the sex of the offender is often ignored. This paper explores the relationship between gender and the willingness to engage in unethical business behavior. If females tend to be more ethical, this has important ramifications for placing them in executive positions in organizations. Determining an ethical profile of marketing majors will also suggest how much emphasis to place on ethics in the classroom.

Because of the growing trend for females to assume top executive positions, this study compares academic achievement, Machiavellian levels, Type A or Type B personality traits, ethical orientation, and charisma of female and male students. Female students report higher academic achievement, but male students are statistically more charismatic than female students. However, female respondents are more ethical. There is no significant difference in the Machiavellian score and Type A/B personality between female and male respondents. Higher academic achievers have higher Machiavellian scores while Type A personalities are more ethical, but are less charismatic.

INTRODUCTION

Developing a corporate culture that encourages ethical behavior and discourages unethical behavior has become a major concern for organizations. However, in discussing business ethics, the sex of the offender is often ignored. This paper explores the relationship between gender and the willingness to engage in unethical business behavior. If females tend to be more ethical, this has important ramifications for placing them in executive positions in organizations. Determining an ethical profile of marketing majors will also suggest how much emphasis to place on ethics in the classroom.

Because of the growing trend for females to assume top executive positions, this study compares academic achievement, Machiavellian levels, Type A or Type B personality traits, ethical orientation, and charisma of female and male students. Female students report higher academic achievement, but male students are statistically more charismatic than female students. However, female respondents are more ethical. There is no significant difference in the Machiavellian score and Type A/B personality between female and male respondents. Higher academic achievers have higher Machiavellian scores, Type A personality are more ethical, but are less charismatic.

One of the most significant trends in the last two decades has been the increase of women in the workforce. With the population of female marketing students growing, it is also important to study whether they differ in personal characteristics from their male counterparts. The majority of past studies have focused on the personal characteristics of male executives because of the small number of females in corporate positions. However, this single gender approach is no longer relevant. It is important to study the impact of more females assuming managerial roles and the implications on the image of the organization.

To assess this impact, this paper also investigates the correlation between gender and Machiavellian orientation, Type A or B personality, and level of charisma. Employees having a high Machiavellian orientation have the potential for disrupting an entire organization. These individuals see what they can get away with but not to the point of becoming obvious to others who are in a position to retaliate. The Machiavellian personality has no loyalty to the organization and mainly approaches all situations from a self-interest perspective. Thus, Machiavellian orientation represents a significant variable that affects an organization and the people interacting with individuals possessing that orientation.

Marketing has traditionally been considered a high stress profession because of its up-or-out environment and time pressures for financial reports, audits, and tax returns. …

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