Academic journal article International Journal of Entrepreneurship

Analysing the Effectiveness of Franchisee Training Program: Empirical Observations from Finland

Academic journal article International Journal of Entrepreneurship

Analysing the Effectiveness of Franchisee Training Program: Empirical Observations from Finland

Article excerpt

ABSTRACT

The Finnish franchisee training program is a unique training given to prospective franchisees by a third party. The program aims to find people interested in franchising and to give them the essential skills and knowledge a franchisee needs. Additional goal is to help the trainees to choose a franchise. In total, more than 200 trainees graduated from the first ten programs held in 1999-2001. The graduates comprise the samples of the current study. The data were collected in two separate phases. The study explores the potential differences of the samples. The purpose of the research is to analyze the effectiveness of the franchisee training program by describing the career shifts of the trainees.

BACKGROUND

In a franchising relationship, the franchisor is responsible for arranging initial and ongoing training for the franchise owners. However, most of the young or smaller size franchisors do not have enough resources to arrange versatile and in-depth training for their franchisees. The Finnish franchisee training program is an answer to this need. It is a unique training given to prospective franchisees by a third party. The program aims to find people interested in franchising and to give them the essential skills and knowledge a franchisee needs. Additional goal is to help the trainees to choose a franchise. The organizing parties behind the programs are the government owned Employment and Economic Development Centres and a private consultation company specialized in franchising. The training program enables franchisors to concentrate on system specific training, while it strives for providing the participants with a realistic view of the time, financial and skills demands of franchise ownership and self-employment. Therefore, the program serves both franchisors and prospective franchisees.

The first program was organized in 1999 in Helsinki. Subsequently, the programs have also been arranged in two other major cities, Tampere and Turku. In total, more than 200 trainees graduated from the first ten programs held in 1999-2001. The graduates comprise the samples of the current study. The data were collected in two separate phases. Mailed questionnaires and phone interviews were used to gather quantitative and qualitative data. In the initial phase 2001, all 100 graduated participants of the first five training programs were surveyed. The study concerning the first five training programs is published in Torikka & Tuunanen (2003). In the latter phase 2003, all graduated participants (N=114) from the programs 6-10 were sampled. The present study explores the potential differences of the samples gathered in these two phases. Moreover, the analysis pertains to the achieved results of the training programs. Consequently, the effectiveness of the training can be evaluated and verified.

The purpose of the research is to analyze the effectiveness of the franchisee training program by describing the career shifts of the trainees. Past literature has shown that the effectiveness of education and training is a multifaceted phenomenon and therefore difficult to measure. Desirable effects of the training may emerge later and in various ways.

Scholars of different disciplines, say pedagogy, economics and psychology, have shown that the effectiveness of education is a multifaceted and controversial phenomenon. For instance, as Orser and Hogarth-Scott (1998) have found, the assessment of education and the perceived value of its outcomes may be dependent upon the stakeholders (i.e. trainers, delivery agents, public policy-makers, business owners and employment equity groups) vested interest in the education. Furthermore, according to Vaherva (1983) the primary or immediate, secondary and even tertiary effects of education can be examined. The effects of education can be seen in the functioning of those educated and the surrounding society and they last as long as the following generation. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.