Academic journal article Journal of the International Academy for Case Studies

RFP, Colorful Origami Turtles for Dr. Wright's Decorating Debris, Inc.: An Experiential Case study.(Instructor's Note)

Academic journal article Journal of the International Academy for Case Studies

RFP, Colorful Origami Turtles for Dr. Wright's Decorating Debris, Inc.: An Experiential Case study.(Instructor's Note)

Article excerpt

CASE DESCRIPTION

The focus of this case is to determine the manufacturing cost of an origami product in order to respond to a request for proposal (RFP). Specifically, the case requires students to utilize concepts of cycle time, line balancing, work measurement, standard times, learning curves, product and process design, capacity, layout and costs. Secondary issues include supply chain management and cost accounting. The case is designed to be integrated into an Operations Management class over the course of several weeks, utilizing between three and five in-class hours and five to seven hours of outside preparation by students.

CASE SYNOPSIS

The case is based upon a real RFP format (1)1. Student teams are presented with an RFP and are expected to submit a completed proposal. This case works best in a very unstructured environment where students are forced to ask questions and use the textbook to find methods for completing the proposal. This case reinforces the concepts listed in the case description above as well as critical thinking, decision making and oral and written communication skills. It assists students in understanding how to apply knowledge to real situations, and can be used to discuss cost accounting, manufacturing management and new product introduction.

INSTRUCTORS' NOTES

OVERVIEW

One of the authors has utilized this case study in various forms for the past 5 years as an experiential learning activity. The author found that most students had never been inside a manufacturing plant and thus found it very difficult to understand the concepts related to manufacturing. The concepts of cycle time, line balancing, work measurement, standard times, learning curves, product and process design, capacity, layout and costs appear to be fairly simple in most texts until students try to apply them to real products. Furthermore, students had some difficulty seeing the connections among the various topics in a typical operations management class and were likely to view the topics as unrelated. The use of a fictional request for proposal (RFP) based on a standard RFP format is effective in tying together all of the concepts listed above.

Students are first given the case study and asked to develop a game plan for developing the proposal. They are told that they will be given crayons, colored pencils, scissors and black and white printed turtles only after they have a complete plan for collecting relevant data to develop costs as they prepare their eight prototype turtles. The information collected during the creation of the prototypes is then used to prepare the proposal. The instructor can modify the assignment from our suggestions to better fit course content. As we have presented it, the ultimate goal in this case is for the student to prepare a final written proposal.

CASE OBJECTIVES

1. To understand the connections among cycle time, line balancing, work measurement, standard times, learning curves, product and process design, capacity, layout and costs.

2. To learn to ask relevant questions and utilize reference books, including the text, to solve real operations management problems.

3. To practice problem identification and discernment of the core concerns that must be addressed in order to find an acceptable solution.

4. To practice applying academic knowledge to real business problems.

5. To reinforce group, critical thinking, decision making and oral and written communication skills.

6. To give students experience in unstructured decision making situations.

SUGGESTED CASE QUESTION

You and your fellow team-mates were recently hired by the Terrific Turtle Company (TTC) to turn the company around. TTC has recorded 12 months of losses. The old proposal response team, which you replaced after their mass firing last week, consistently placed job bids that ended up being lower than the actual costs. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.