Academic journal article History Review

Video

Academic journal article History Review

Video

Article excerpt

Arguably, last year's big application was Google Earth (www.earth.google.com). This year, the accolade must surely go to www.youtube.com, a site allowing members of the public to upload and share video clips with the minimum of hassle. For teachers, the site is an absolute godsend: search for video on any topic you choose and you are usually presented with an array of high quality clips from documentaries, feature films and music videos. Other sites have followed suit- www.teachers.tv, www.vidipedia.org, www.teachertube.net and www.vidipedia.com being particularly worthy examples - but YouTube remains the first port of call for teachers and students seeking multimedia content.

The most obvious drawback of these sites is that the video clips run 'live' from the web (a process called 'streaming'). In other words, you don't download the clips onto your computer so you can watch them in your own time. This can be inconvenient if, for example, your network manager has blocked access to such sites or you have a slow internet connection in the classroom.

Fortunately, there are various ways of circumventing this difficulty. …

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