Academic journal article Journal of College Science Teaching

The Many Faces of Inductive Teaching and Learning: This Study Examines the Effectiveness and Implementation of Different Inductive Teaching Methods, Including Inquiry-Based Learning, Problem-Based Learning, Project-Based Learning, Case-Based Teaching, Discovery Learning, and Just-in-Time Teaching

Academic journal article Journal of College Science Teaching

The Many Faces of Inductive Teaching and Learning: This Study Examines the Effectiveness and Implementation of Different Inductive Teaching Methods, Including Inquiry-Based Learning, Problem-Based Learning, Project-Based Learning, Case-Based Teaching, Discovery Learning, and Just-in-Time Teaching

Article excerpt

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Science courses are traditionally taught deductively. The instructor first teaches students relevant theory and mathematical models, then moves on to textbook exercises, and eventually--maybe--gets to real-world applications. Often the only motivation students have to learn the material, beyond grades, is the vague promise that it will be important later in the curriculum or in their careers. Failure to connect course content to the real world has repeatedly been shown to contribute to students leaving the sciences (Seymour and Hewitt 1997; Kardash and Wallace 2001).

A better way to motivate students is inductive teaching, in which the instructor begins by presenting students with a specific challenge, such as experimental data to interpret, a case study to analyze, or a complex real-world problem to solve. Students grappling with these challenges quickly recognize the need for facts, skills, and conceptual understanding, at which point the teacher provides instruction or helps students learn on their own. Bransford, Brown, and Cocking (2000) survey extensive neurological and psychological research that provides strong support for inductive teaching methods. The literature also demonstrates that inductive methods encourage students to adopt a deep approach to learning (Ramsden 2003; Norman and Schmidt 1992; Coles 1985) and that the challenges provided by inductive methods serve as precursors to intellectual development (Felder and Brent 2004).

Inductive teaching methods come in many forms, including discovery learning, inquiry-based learning, problem-based learning, project-based learning, case-based teaching, and just-in-time teaching. Few studies have examined these methods as a group. Prince and Felder (2006) provide an extensive analysis of the conceptual frameworks and research bases for inductive teaching, review applications of inductive methods in engineering education, and state the roles of other student-centered approaches, such as active and cooperative learning, in inductive teaching. This paper briefly reviews the distinguishing features of the principal inductive methods, describes illustrative applications in the sciences, discusses practical issues of implementation, and suggests resources for instructors who wish to use one or more inductive methods in their own teaching.

Inductive teaching methods

What inductive methods have in common is that students are presented with a challenge and then learn what they need to know to address the challenge. The methods differ in the nature and scope of the challenge and in the amount of guidance students receive from their instructor as they attempt to meet the challenge.

Inquiry-based learning

In inquiry-based learning (also known as inquiry-guided learning or guided inquiry), students are presented with a challenge (such as a question to be answered, an observation or data set to be interpreted, or a hypothesis to be tested) and accomplish the desired learning in the process of responding to that challenge. As with all inductive methods, the information needed to address the challenge would not have been previously covered explicitly in lectures or readings, although it would normally build on previously known material. Inquiry has frequently been found to be more effective than traditional science instruction at improving academic achievement and the development of thinking, problem-solving, and laboratory skills (Smith 1996; Haury 1993; McReary, Golde, and Koeske 2006; Shymansky, Hedges, and Woodworth 1990; Rubin 1996; Oliver-Hoyo and Allen 2005; Oliver-Hoyo et al. 2004). Colburn (2006) recommends focusing inquiry-based activities around questions that call for experimental investigation, involve materials and situations somewhat familiar to students, and pose a sufficient level of challenge to promote skill development.

Inquiry-based methods have been used in many different disciplines, including physics (Fencl and Scheel 2005; McDermott 1995; Thacker et al. …

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