Academic journal article Journal of College Science Teaching

Biofuels

Academic journal article Journal of College Science Teaching

Biofuels

Article excerpt

As the United States looks to alternate fuel sources, ethanol has become one of the front runners. Farmers have begun planting corn in the hopes that its potential new use will be a new income source. What many don't realize is the potential for other crops, besides corn, to provide an alternate energy source to fossil fuels. Scientists studied the greenhouse gas emissions and bioenergy of corn, hybrid poplar, switchgrass, and other crops to determine the efficiency of various biocrops in terms of energy consumption and energy output.

The study, "Net Greenhouse Gas Flux of Bioenergy Cropping Systems Using Daycent," was completed by Paul Adler (USDA), Stephen Del Grosso (USDA and Colorado State University), and William Parton (Colorado State University). Results appear in the April issue of Ecological Applications.

Adler, Del Grosso, and Parton used the Daycent biogeochemistry model developed by Parton and Del Grosso to assess greenhouse gas fluxes and biomass yields for corn, soybean, alfalfa, hybrid poplar, reed canary grass, and switchgrass.

The results of the study showed that when compared with gasoline and diesel, ethanol and biodiesel from corn and soybean rotations reduced greenhouse gas emissions by almost 40%, reed canary grass by 85%. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.