Academic journal article Hong Kong Journal of Psychiatry

Psychometric Properties of the Chinese Version of the Impact of Event Scale-Revised

Academic journal article Hong Kong Journal of Psychiatry

Psychometric Properties of the Chinese Version of the Impact of Event Scale-Revised

Article excerpt

Abstract

Objective: This study examined the psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the Impact of Event Scale-Revised.

Patients and Methods: The first phase of the study included 575 patients who had undergone a motor vehicle accident. The Chinese Impact of Event Scale-Revised, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist, and General Health Questionnaire-20 completed by the patients 1 week after the accident were evaluated. In the second phase of the study, 46 patients were interviewed 1 month after the accident for administration of the Chinese Impact of Event Scale-Revised and the Clinician-Administered Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Scale.

Results: A 2-factor structure accounting for 58% of the variance was identified. The validity of the Impact of Event Scale-Revised as a measure of psychological distress after a traumatic event was supported by the moderate correlations between various Impact of Event Scale-Revised subscale scores and the General Health Questionnaire-20 and the strong correlations between scores in the Impact of Event Scale-Revised and the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist. The Chinese Impact of Event Scale-Revised had good sensitivity and specificity for the screening of post-traumatic stress disorder based on the Clinician-Administered Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Scale.

Conclusion: The Chinese version of the Impact of Event Scale-Revised was found to have satisfactory psychometric properties.

Key words: Accidents, traffic, Stress disorders, post-traumatic, Wounds and injuries

Introduction

The Impact of Event Scale (IES) was widely used for exploring the psychological impact of a variety of traumas. (1) The theoretical formulation of the IES is based on clinical studies of psychological response to stressful events and on the theory of the stress response syndrome. (2) According to the stress response theory, the 2 common responses to stress involve intrusion and avoidance. These 2 responses tend to oscillate during the same time period. Avoidant behaviour serves to restore emotional equilibrium, prevent emotional flooding, and reduce conceptual disorganisation. However, these defensive efforts are disrupted by intrusive experiences leading to a dread state. To restore stability, people react with heightened defensive control. Although avoidance of painful thoughts may reduce the state of dread, such avoidance may also prevent adaptation to the traumatic experience and lead to persistent post-traumatic stress. On the basis of this assumption, the IES was developed to study the intrusive experience and avoidant behaviour in reaction to traumatic events. As noted by Weiss and Marmar, (3) research using the IES has helped to provide evidence that contributes to the adoption of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the nomenclature; PTSD was first recognised as a diagnostic entity in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-III (DSM-III). (4) According to a recent review, the psychometric properties of the IES have been demonstrated in many studies and used to research the psychological impact of various traumatic life events. Results have indicated that the IES's 2-factor structure is stable for different types of events, and that the scale has convergent validity with diagnosed PTSD. (5)

Weiss and Marmar revised the IES by including items to track responses in the domain of hyperarousal symptoms. (3) This revision was consistent with the inclusion of hyperarousal symptoms in the diagnostic criteria of PTSD in DSM-IV. (6) Together with the 15 items in the original IES, the IES-R comprises 22 items. The sound psychometric properties of the IES-R in English and Chinese have been demonstrated in previous studies. (3,7)

Compared with other self-report measures that are specifically associated with the PTSD such as the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist, (8) the strength of the IES-R lies in the vast amount of literature based on the use of the original IES. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.