Academic journal article Hong Kong Journal of Psychiatry

Validation of the Cantonese Version of Family Burden Interview Schedule on Caregivers of Patients with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

Academic journal article Hong Kong Journal of Psychiatry

Validation of the Cantonese Version of Family Burden Interview Schedule on Caregivers of Patients with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

Article excerpt

Abstract

Objective: To validate the Cantonese version of Family Burden Interview Schedule for assessing the burden on caregivers of obsessive-compulsive disorder patients.

Patients and Methods: The Family Burden Interview Schedule was first translated into Cantonese, then back-translated into English for comparison. Seventy seven obsessive-compulsive disorder patient-caregiver dyads were recruited from a psychiatric outpatient clinic. The Cantonese version of Family Burden Interview Schedule and the Chinese version of General Health Questionnaire-12 were applied to the caregivers. Patients were assessed by the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale and the Global Assessment of Functioning scale.

Results: Concurrent validity was established by correlation with Chinese version of the General Health Questionnaire-12 (rs = 0.644, p < 0.01). Construct validity was shown by correlations with Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (rs = 0.621, p < 0.01) and Global Assessment of Functioning scale (rs = -0.721, p < 0.01), and correlation between objective and subjective burden scores (rs = 0.781, p < 0.01). Cronbach's alpha for internal consistency was 0.90. Intraclass correlation coefficients for inter-rater and test-retest reliability were 0.988 and 0.986, respectively.

Conclusion: The Cantonese version of Family Burden Interview Schedule is a valid and reliable instrument for assessing the burden on caregivers of obsessive-compulsive disorder patients.

Key words: Caregivers, Cost of illness, Hong Kong, Interviews, Obsessive-compulsive disorder, Translating

Introduction

The subject of burden has become significant with the trends of deinstitutionalisation and the implementation of community mental health service over the last 50 years. Grad and Sainsbury estimated burden by rating the effect the patient had on the family's income, social activities, domestic and school routines; the strain the patient put on other family members and the problems the patient caused with neighbours. (1) Hoenig and Hamilton tried to differentiate between "objective burden" (effects on the household including financial loss; effects on health, on children and family routine; and the abnormal behaviours shown by the patient) and "subjective burden" (the extent to which relatives felt they carried a burden). (2,3) Up to the early 1980s, multiple definitions of burden existed in the literature. Irrespective of the terminology chosen, they all shared a common underlying frame of reference: "the effect of the patient upon the family" or "the various difficulties felt by the family of a psychiatric patient". (4,5)

Although it is now several decades since the emergence of the concept of burden, studies in the area of burden have mainly focused on specific disease groups, particularly schizophrenia, dementia and affective disorders. (6-9) The burden on families of patients suffering from obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has largely been neglected.

Caregivers of OCD patients are a specific group as they are frequently brought into the patient's illness. (10) Caregivers become involved through participation in patients' rituals and through modifications of their daily routines. By doing so, they become distressed, with burden on areas of family life, social life and personal life. Cooper examined the effects of OCD on 181 family members. (11) About half of the respondents in the study reported great disturbance because of disruption of family social life, loss of relationships, marital discord, loss of leisure, financial problems and hardship to siblings. Most of the respondents noted that the burden of care fell mainly on the principal caregiver. Magliano et al assessed the burden on key relatives of 32 patients with OCD and a control sample of 26 patients with major depression. (12) A moderate to severe burden was detected in both samples in most of the explored situations of objective and subjective burden. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.