Academic journal article T H E Journal (Technological Horizons In Education)

Happy Birthday 2.0: How I Learned It's Not So Easy to Gift-Wrap the Internet

Academic journal article T H E Journal (Technological Horizons In Education)

Happy Birthday 2.0: How I Learned It's Not So Easy to Gift-Wrap the Internet

Article excerpt

A SINGULAR BLEND of vanity and boredom, Googling yourself is the new thumb twiddling. It is the nadir of idleness, a last desperate act before you're forced to do something constructive, like sit-ups.

In truth, there's one floor lower than Googling yourself: Googling a relative. That's how I came to the terrible knowledge that, according to the internet, my own mother doesn't exist. I Googled her and came up empty. Google delivers countless links for that confection Nicole Richie, but can't flag down anything on my mom. Score: Nicole Richie, 2,880,000; my mother, zero. It's enough to elicit a tremor of indignation. Hey! That's my mother you're not talking about!

There's no shortage of Arlene Weinstocks out there, but none is my mother, unless my mother is a colored-pencil artist in Arlington, VA. That would explain a few things--such as why my colored pencils are always missing. So, for her 60-some-odd birthday, I decided to get my morn something she didn't even know she could have: a Wikipedia entry. That would get her some internet cred.

It turns out Wikipedia is a tough nut to crack. You stand a better chance of getting into Harvard. After entering my mother's biography, I was informed that the entry didn't meet Wikipedia's "notability guidelines." Oh, is that so? What, raising three kids isn't notable? Being an original member of the Minneapolis Lakers dance squad isn't notable? Being flummoxed by call waiting three decades since its introduction isn't notable? …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.