Academic journal article Environmental Health Perspectives

Stress Reaction: Ozone and Co-Pollutants Linked with Oxidation

Academic journal article Environmental Health Perspectives

Stress Reaction: Ozone and Co-Pollutants Linked with Oxidation

Article excerpt

Past studies have hinted that several air pollutants can cause oxidative stress in people, suggesting one mechanism behind diseases such as lung cancer, asthma, and increased cardiopulmonary illnesses and deaths. The evidence has gained more support with the discovery that chronic exposure to ambient ozone, nitrogen dioxide, or particulates is strongly linked with lipid peroxidation, an indicator of oxidative stress [EHP 115:1732-1737; Chen et al.]. Moreover, more damage was seen at higher pollutant concentrations.

Researchers evaluated two oxidative stress indicators in the blood of 120 University of California, Berkeley, students aged 18 to 22 years. Each student was a lifelong resident of either the Los Angeles or San Francisco area, where they had experienced variable seasonal exposures to pollutants including ozone.

To assess lipid peroxidation, the researchers measured 8-iso-prostaglandins-[F.sub.2[alpha]] (8-iso-PGF), which has been found in several studies to be a useful indicator. To assess total antioxidant capacity, they measured ferric-reducing ability of plasma (FRAP), which has a more limited history as an indicator. Pollutant concentrations were estimated from data at monitoring stations near where the students lived.

The lifelong Los Angeles residents had received much higher average ozone exposure over the course of a lifetime (42. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.